Cartography as an expression of empire: mapping colonial North America and the young American Republic

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Publication Type dissertation
School or College College of Humanities
Department History
Author Martin, William Karl
Title Cartography as an expression of empire: mapping colonial North America and the young American Republic
Date 2014-12
Description During the last third of the twentieth century, the history of cartography caught the interest of more than a few historians who would have otherwise viewed maps as interesting, but not entirely essential to the focus of their chosen research. Since the pioneering work of J. B. Harley, David Woodward, and others, it has become more apparent that a closer inspection of the nature of maps, and cartography's part in any historical narrative, will offer information that the historian might otherwise overlook. This is especially true regarding the role that cartography plays in building and sustaining early modern empires. This dissertation explores and defines the elements of the cartographical representations in the North American imperial experience from its early colonial period to the middle of the nineteenth century. The work proceeds chronologically from the early English, French, Dutch, and Spanish territorial claims and acquisitions, to the United States' expansion of its continental holdings at the close of the Mexican War.
Type Text
Publisher University of Utah
Subject Cartography; Empire
Dissertation Institution University of Utah
Dissertation Name Doctor of Philosophy
Language eng
Rights Management Copyright © William Karl Martin 2014
Format Medium application/pdf
Format Extent 8,540,341 bytes
Identifier etd3/id/3256
ARK ark:/87278/s61g3vhv
Setname ir_etd
Date Created 2015-02-03
Date Modified 2017-11-02
ID 196821
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s61g3vhv