Influence of religiosity, spirituality, and cancer fatalism beliefs on time to seek medical care for self-detected breast changes in African American women.

Publication Type dissertation
School or College College of Nursing
Department Nursing
Author Gullatte, Mary Magee
Title Influence of religiosity, spirituality, and cancer fatalism beliefs on time to seek medical care for self-detected breast changes in African American women.
Date 2008-05
Description A delay of 3 months or more is a significant factor in breast cancer mortality. Factors contributing to delay in time to seek medical care include age, income, level of education, family history of breast cancer, lack of access, lack of knowledge, and spiritual, religious, and fatalism beliefs. Using a descriptive correlation design this study examined relationships between religiosity, spirituality, cancer fatalism, and who the African American women told about their breast symptom with time to seek medical care, and breast cancer stage for self-detected breast changes. A convenience sample of 129 African American women between the ages of 30 and 84 years with self-detected breast changes were recruited for this study. No associations were found between the predictor variables and time to seek medical care. The median delay from self-detection of a breast symptom to seeking medical care was 5.5 months. Women who delayed >3 months were more likely to present with a later stage of breast cancer at diagnosis. Women who were less educated, unmarried, and only talked to God about their breast change were more likely to delay. Women who told someone about their breast change were likely to seek care medical care sooner. Findings of this study can be used to offer new interventions that promote telling someone about self-detected breast changes and faith based opportunities to equate good religious practice with prompt medical diagnosis. Implications for practice involve further investigation into the faith based beliefs of only talking to God and telling someone about the breast symptom for African American women. There is a need for comparative qualitative studies of women who hold high religious and spiritual beliefs yet do not delay seeking medical care to those women with the same profile who do delay. This could yield important insights about how religious beliefs are a barrier for some but not others in seeking medical care. This knowledge can aid health care providers in guiding these women to seek early medical care as a compliment to their strong religious and spiritual beliefs for self-detected breast symptoms.
Type Text
Publisher University of Utah
Subject Religion; Hygiene
Subject MESH African Continental Ancestry Group; Breast Neoplasms; Women's Health
Dissertation Institution University of Utah
Dissertation Name PhD
Language eng
Relation is Version of Digital reproduction of “Influence of religiosity, spirituality, and cancer fatalism beliefs on time to seek medical care for self-detected breast changes in African American women.” Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library. Print version of “The influence of religiosity, spirituality, and cancer fatalism beliefs on time to seek medical care for self-detected breast changes in African American women” available at J. Willard Marriott Library Special Collection. RC39.5 2008 .G84.
Rights Management © Mary Magee Gullatte, To comply with copyright, the file for this work may be restricted to The University of Utah campus libraries pending author permission.
Format Medium application/pdf
Identifier us-etd2,72090
Source Original: University of Utah Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library (no longer available).
Funding/Fellowship NCI traing grant R25 CA093831 (Kathi Mooney, principla investigator); The Oncology Nursing; Society/Doctoral Scholarship, Pittsburgh, Ph and Emory Healthcare of Emory University, Atlanta GA.
ARK ark:/87278/s6cv4z9p
ID 193327
setname ir_etd
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/details?id=193327
Back to Search Results