Participation of Widowed Older Adults in a Self-Care and Health Education Program: Application of the Theory of Reasoned Action

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Identifier 1999_Rice
Title Participation of Widowed Older Adults in a Self-Care and Health Education Program: Application of the Theory of Reasoned Action
Creator Rice, Sarah Jane
Subject Spouses; Widowhood; Grief; Bereavement; Adaptation, Psychological; Health Promotion; Attitude to Health; Health Literacy; Health Behavior; Self Care; Independent Living; Outcome Assessment (Health Care); Health Education; Questionnaires; Aging Populations; Well-Being; Functional Independence; Aging in Place; Optimal Aging; Theory of Reasoned Action
Description Decreased morbidity and mortality are just two of the documented outcomes from health promotion activities. Older adults who have recently lost a spouse are potentially at greater risk of compromised health and of becoming more functionally dependent. They can potentially benefit from health promotion programs designed to address these issues. Unfortunately, efforts to attract members of the older population to many established health promotion programs has not been entirely successful. A theoretically guided examination of those factors that could potentially influence participation in health interventions is crucial. The Theory of Reasoned Action is a framework that has proven useful in designing and implementing health promotion programs for a variety of populations. The purpose of this study is to determine to what extent the Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) predicts attendance in Pathfinders, a self-care and health education program. A group (N=35) of older adults (age 50+) who had been widowed were recruited to participate in a series of weekly classes and asked to complete self-administered questionnaires. The average age for the sample was 66.5 (SD=7.9), with a median length of widowhood equivalent to 9 months. They attended an average of 7.5 classes out of 11. Thirty-three of the 35 participants (94%) were female. Only two factors had a significant correlation to attendance. Those who were more recently widowed and who were married longer prior to widowhood tended to attend more classes. None of the components of the TRA model itself were associated with attendance to the classes. However, attitude toward behavior and normative expectations did correlate to the intention to attend. Future research should attempt to use multiple indicators to measure the TRA components when applied to a health promotion program. Additional work is also clearly needed to more systematically assess those potential unanticipated obstacles to participation in self-care programs that could ultimately benefit participants overall health, well being, and functional independence.
Publisher Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah
Date 1999
Language eng
Rights Management Copyright © Sarah Jane Rice 1999
Holding Institution Spencer S. Eccles Health Sciences Library, University of Utah
Scanning Technician sg
Metadata Cataloger AMT
Name Sarah Jane Rice
Type Text
ARK ark:/87278/s6gx78vb
Setname ehsl_gerint
Date Created 2013-01-28
Date Modified 2018-06-08
ID 179466
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/ark:/87278/s6gx78vb
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