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Title Volume 08, Number 3, 4, Autumn-Winter 1973
Subject Periodicals; Mormons; Religious thought; Philosophy and religion
Description Independent national quarterly established to express Mormon culture and examine the relevance of religion to secular life. It is edited by Mormons who wish to bring their faith into dialogue with human experience as a whole and to foster artistic and scholarly achievement based on their cultural heritage. The journal encourages a variety of viewpoints; although every effort is made to insure accurate scholarship and responsible judgment, the views expressed are those of the individual authors and are not necessarily those of the Mormon Church or of the editors.
Website http://dialoguejournal.com
Publisher Dialogue Foundation, 900 Hilgard Avenue, Los Angeles, California 90024
Scanning Vendor Backstage Library Works - 1180 S. 800 E. Orem, UT 84097
Contributors Rees, Robert A.
Date 1973
Type Text
Digitization Specifications Pages scanned at 400ppi on Fujitsu fi-5650C sheetfed scanner as 8-bit grayscale or 24-bit RGB uncompressed TIFF images. Images resized to 950 pixels wide, 150 dpi, and saved as JPEG (level 8) in PhotoShop CS with Unsharp Mask of 100/.3.
Language eng
Rights Management Digital image, copyright 2004, Dialogue Foundation. All rights reserved.
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ID 153781
setname uu_djmt
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/details?id=153781

Page Metadata

Title Page 185
Identifier V08N0304-1815_Page 185.jpg
Source Dialogue: Vol 8 No 3, 4
Description teased and joked with the children. One family night she announced with pride she had begun reading the Bible. Back home we prayed ". . . bless Larry [our son] on his mission, and Vicki that she'll be happy and be with us soon; and bless grandma and grandpa. . . ." The children spoke proudly of their new Sis, Vicky, but were icy in their reply to "What's she in there for?" Such a question was regarded as both irrelevant and impertinent: "We haven't really discussed the matter. Anyway, she's a much better person than almost anyone we know on the outside." Earlier this year when the National Observer featured a lengthy article titled "These Contenders All Win," the entire family gathered excitedly to hear how successful the home evening program was: . . . the idea is spreading to prisons outside Utah and now is being adopted in the Federal prison system. Smith, of Norwalk, Conn., is one of 60 Utah State Prison inmates in a family-centered "adopt-a-prisoner" program that is attracting the attention of sociologists and penologists nationally. Its participants' lack of recidivism so far makes the program look impressive: Of 140 released inmates who have been "adopted" by volunteer families in the past five years, only 2 have been convicted of subsequent crimes and returned to prison. That recidivism rate of less than 2 per cent is far below the ^ per cent for the whole prison and the rate of nearly 80 per cent nationally. . . . (June 9, 1973, p. 1). Easter Church services at the prison were memorable: the talk on the hope for new life in the spring, the hymn by the inmates, and Vicky's powerful uninhibited poetic rendition of the Creation. Vicki's Mother's Day letter became one of our real treasures. Its very personal nature admits of only brief quotation: Some people think that a mother is just anyone who has children, but it goes a lot deeper than that. You are all the things that a mother should be. You're kind, loving, understanding, and most of all you care. There haven't been very many people that have cared about me. . . . One of our proudest moments was attending Vicky's graduation at prison. She delivered a beautiful, memorized address that she had composed herself. I recall an observation early in her talk: "I was told there would be stereophonic sound to amplify my weak voice; would that there were electronic equipment that could amplify my feeble thoughts." Despite this protestation she stirred her audience with her insight, her positive point of view and her eloquence. She urged Personal Voices I 185 fellow inmates to seize their "time" and use it profitably in lifting themselves from their present state. The address made her an immediate celebrity with the media, officials, and inmates: but she managed to extricate herself to be photographed with her Church family. That night she penned an almost lyrical letter to us: I was almost speechless because you were so proud of me. That made me feel so good inside! I couldn't help but be happy! I wanted you to be proud of me, and when I saw you were I was so overwhelmed with joy! that I couldn't concentrate. I came to my room and said a prayer thanking our Heavenly Father for such wonderful loving parents, and such a beautiful night in my life. On graduation night Dad said something that I shall forever treasure. He said, "We're so proud of you!" Those words made my night perfect. Very few people have ever told me that. It made me want to cry. I will always be the very best person that I can be. I will never go backwards but always forward, for myself, for my children and for you.. . . Still another highlight was our appearing with Vicki before the Parole Board. We strived for as much objectivity as our love would permit, so that it wouldn't appear we were simply being manipulated by our inmate. During the long wait we discussed many things, including our awareness that she must be undergoing some rejection and scorn as a result of her attachment to her white "Church family." The following lines were written to reasure us: To: My Family With All My Love THIS LOVE I must place a kiss upon your cheek, I must whisper I Love You in your ear. I do not care where we are: I do not care who is near. For my Love knows no certain moment: It is here all the time. It's very strong, It's very sincere. I do not care who knows. For it is the Love we have That has changed my life From a half of a life to a whole. It is this Love That makes me want to kiss your cheek, To whisper in your ear, Makes me smile when you're near My love is yours: Your love is mine; It is a precious gift I never dreamed I'd find. Those who look upon us with distaste, Let them go their separate ways. For what we have is beautiful,
Format image/jpeg
ID 153772
setname uu_djmt
Reference URL https://collections.lib.utah.edu/details?id=153772